No tricks, all treats this Halloween


By Sydney Johnson - Contributing columnist



Johnson


Pumpkins are carved, spooky decorations are up, costumes are assembled, and all are ready for some Halloween fun. This year, enjoy a safe and happy Halloween by following these tips from the FDA, the Consumer Product Safety Commission, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention:

1. Wear costumes made of fire-retardant materials; look for “flame resistant” on the label. If you’re of the crafty variety, make your costume out of flame-resistant fabrics such as polyester or nylon.

2. Wear bright, reflective costumes or add strips of reflective tape so you’ll be more visible. You can also carry a flashlight to help you see and help others see you.

3. Avoid children snacking on treats from their goody bags by feeding them a light meal or snack before they head out. Don’t send them out on an empty stomach. Urge them to wait until they get home to let you inspect their goods before they eat any of it.

4. Make sure your little goblin is not accepting anything that isn’t commercially wrapped. Inspect treats for signs of tampering, such as an unusual appearance or discoloration, tiny pinholes, or tears in wrappers. Throw away anything that looks suspicious.

5. If any young children are trick or treating, be sure to remove any choking hazards such as gum, peanuts, hard candies, or small toys.

6. Bobbing for apples is always fun, but dangerous bacteria? Not so much. Say “boo” to bacteria that can cause foodborne illness. Thoroughly rinse apples and other raw fruits under cool running water. You may also use a produce brush to remove surface dirt for added protection.

7. If you’re a party thrower, be sure to keep your guests safe by avoiding the use of unpasteurized juice or cider. This can contain harmful bacteria such as Salmonella. Keep perishable foods such as finger sandwiches, cheese platters, fruit or tossed salads, and cream pies or cakes with whipped-cream and cream-cheese toppings chilled until serving time. Don’t leave perishable goodies out of the fridge for more than two hours to avoid harmful bacteria from creeping up on you and your guests.

Sydney Johnson is an Area Family & Consumer Sciences extension agent with the North Carolina Cooperative Extension Service in Sampson County. She can be reached by calling 910-592-7161 or by email at Sydney_Johnson@ncsu.edu.

Johnson
http://www.clintonnc.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/10/web1_Johnson-3.jpgJohnson

By Sydney Johnson

Contributing columnist

Sydney Johnson is an Area Family & Consumer Sciences extension agent with the North Carolina Cooperative Extension Service in Sampson County. She can be reached by calling 910-592-7161 or by email at Sydney_Johnson@ncsu.edu.

Sydney Johnson is an Area Family & Consumer Sciences extension agent with the North Carolina Cooperative Extension Service in Sampson County. She can be reached by calling 910-592-7161 or by email at Sydney_Johnson@ncsu.edu.

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