Up close and personal


Shutterbugs 2 students hone their macro, shutter speed skills

By Sherry Matthews - smatthews@clintonnc.com



Shutterbugs 2 student Alvinia Parker captured the light just right as she zoomed in on this mushroom for a close-up. The picture, Parker said, was taken on a sunny day, around 6 p.m. ‘This picture shows a drop of water about to fall from the mushroom, a sunny reflection on the mushroom and the protruding dirt as the mushroom is growing.


Calling one her top five pictures in the Shutterbugs 2 class ‘Fall colors,’ Lynette Honeycutt used the macro setting on her camera to capture the vibrant colors of this flower in her yard.


Using lines and angles, student Teresa Young made what she called a simplistic shot an artsy photograph. Called ‘Hang 10,’ Young shot this photograph on a Sampson County farm, using the hat as her subject and the wide open spaces of field and sky as the backdrop.


Tiffany Sessoms uses a glass ball to capture a flower’s reflection. Calling the shot ‘Mystical,’ Sessoms said she chose this photograph as one of her top exam pictures because it ‘looks like a vision from another place and time.’


Kathleen Gancer’s ‘Marbles,’ was among her top choices for exam photos because, she said, it showed how she could use a fast shutter speed to catch the movement of water. She took the photo in her dining room, dropping a marble into the water and then photographing it.


Showing a good use of lines, Gancer’s second photo, entitled ‘Myrtle Beach’ gives the eye a sight line that directs them down the boardwalk to the beach. ‘The eye just follows the umbrellas,’ Gancer said, pointing out that she also liked the colorfulness of the photo.


‘Water droplets’ was another of Lynette Honeycutt’s exam photos. Taken outside at Sampson Community College, Honeycutt said she used her macro setting to get the drops of water on the bright purple petal.


The peacefulness of a waterfall was among Alvinia Parker’s exam photos. Taken in Fayetteville, Parker said she used a fast shutter speed to give the scene a look of white water.


With one photography class under their belt, Sampson Community College Shutterbugs 2 students turned their attention to more detail as they honed their skills in the art of macro photography, learning to adjust shutter speeds and turning an ordinary picture into their own piece of art.

In most cases, students said, it began with learning how to ease out of their comfort zone and do things they hadn’t done before, something Shutterbugs 2 instructor Kelly Jones tried to encourage them to do as they turned their lens toward everything from outdoor scenes to upclose and personal pictures of things in their homes.

Kathleen Gancer used an ordinary marble and a saucer of water to test her skills with shutter speed, capturing a dramatic photo of the water’s movement.

Alvinia Parker tested her skills with white water photography, taking shots of a waterfall in Fayetteville and then turning her camera to a more close-up view of a mushroom on a bright and sunny day.

In every case, students said they took what they learned in Digital Dos and Don’ts, taught by Sebrinia Johnson, and grew in Jones’ secondary class, aimed at providing them the tools to hone skills in everything from macro photography to blurring backgrounds and opting to shoot at various angles to get that perfect shot.

“We all have a camera and a lens, it’s what you do with it that separates you from other photographers,” Jones said. “Everyone has a vision and a creative side, and you will see it in the end result of a photograph. Each photograph is an artist.”

And that’s the knowledge she tried to impart to her Shutterbugs 2 students during the 10-week course, which ended last month.

“I learned a great deal,” Lynette Honeycutt said about her second photography class at Sampson Community College. “Kelly was very hands-on and helpful with all of us.”

Parker agreed. “I gained knowledge regarding macro shots, obtaining the right SD cards and filling the frame.”

Honeycutt said Jones made the class fun while “teaching me things about my camera that aren’t on the auto section. The challenges that she gave us to do for our homework proved to be very helpful as far as finding the focus points, making sure lighting was how it needed to be and taking pictures at different angles. It was all beneficial to me.”

Each student in the class said they walked away with more appreciation for their cameras and what they could do with them.

“I love photography and part of the reason is the lessons I’ve learned,” Gancer said.

Johnson’s Digital Dos and Jones’ Shutterbugs 2 and 3 will resume in February. To participate in Shutterbugs classes, students must first have Digital Dos. To register or for more information on the photography classes, call SCC at 910-592-8081.

Shutterbugs 2 student Alvinia Parker captured the light just right as she zoomed in on this mushroom for a close-up. The picture, Parker said, was taken on a sunny day, around 6 p.m. ‘This picture shows a drop of water about to fall from the mushroom, a sunny reflection on the mushroom and the protruding dirt as the mushroom is growing.
http://www.clintonnc.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/web1_Parker1.jpgShutterbugs 2 student Alvinia Parker captured the light just right as she zoomed in on this mushroom for a close-up. The picture, Parker said, was taken on a sunny day, around 6 p.m. ‘This picture shows a drop of water about to fall from the mushroom, a sunny reflection on the mushroom and the protruding dirt as the mushroom is growing.

Calling one her top five pictures in the Shutterbugs 2 class ‘Fall colors,’ Lynette Honeycutt used the macro setting on her camera to capture the vibrant colors of this flower in her yard.
http://www.clintonnc.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/web1_fallcolors-Honeycutt.jpgCalling one her top five pictures in the Shutterbugs 2 class ‘Fall colors,’ Lynette Honeycutt used the macro setting on her camera to capture the vibrant colors of this flower in her yard.

Using lines and angles, student Teresa Young made what she called a simplistic shot an artsy photograph. Called ‘Hang 10,’ Young shot this photograph on a Sampson County farm, using the hat as her subject and the wide open spaces of field and sky as the backdrop.
http://www.clintonnc.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/web1_Teresa-Young.jpgUsing lines and angles, student Teresa Young made what she called a simplistic shot an artsy photograph. Called ‘Hang 10,’ Young shot this photograph on a Sampson County farm, using the hat as her subject and the wide open spaces of field and sky as the backdrop.

Tiffany Sessoms uses a glass ball to capture a flower’s reflection. Calling the shot ‘Mystical,’ Sessoms said she chose this photograph as one of her top exam pictures because it ‘looks like a vision from another place and time.’
http://www.clintonnc.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/web1_Mystical-TS.jpgTiffany Sessoms uses a glass ball to capture a flower’s reflection. Calling the shot ‘Mystical,’ Sessoms said she chose this photograph as one of her top exam pictures because it ‘looks like a vision from another place and time.’

Kathleen Gancer’s ‘Marbles,’ was among her top choices for exam photos because, she said, it showed how she could use a fast shutter speed to catch the movement of water. She took the photo in her dining room, dropping a marble into the water and then photographing it.
http://www.clintonnc.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/web1_marbledrops.jpgKathleen Gancer’s ‘Marbles,’ was among her top choices for exam photos because, she said, it showed how she could use a fast shutter speed to catch the movement of water. She took the photo in her dining room, dropping a marble into the water and then photographing it.

Showing a good use of lines, Gancer’s second photo, entitled ‘Myrtle Beach’ gives the eye a sight line that directs them down the boardwalk to the beach. ‘The eye just follows the umbrellas,’ Gancer said, pointing out that she also liked the colorfulness of the photo.
http://www.clintonnc.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/web1_Closedforseason.jpgShowing a good use of lines, Gancer’s second photo, entitled ‘Myrtle Beach’ gives the eye a sight line that directs them down the boardwalk to the beach. ‘The eye just follows the umbrellas,’ Gancer said, pointing out that she also liked the colorfulness of the photo.

‘Water droplets’ was another of Lynette Honeycutt’s exam photos. Taken outside at Sampson Community College, Honeycutt said she used her macro setting to get the drops of water on the bright purple petal.
http://www.clintonnc.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/web1_waterdrop-Honeycutt.jpg‘Water droplets’ was another of Lynette Honeycutt’s exam photos. Taken outside at Sampson Community College, Honeycutt said she used her macro setting to get the drops of water on the bright purple petal.

The peacefulness of a waterfall was among Alvinia Parker’s exam photos. Taken in Fayetteville, Parker said she used a fast shutter speed to give the scene a look of white water.
http://www.clintonnc.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/web1_Parker-2.jpgThe peacefulness of a waterfall was among Alvinia Parker’s exam photos. Taken in Fayetteville, Parker said she used a fast shutter speed to give the scene a look of white water.
Shutterbugs 2 students hone their macro, shutter speed skills

By Sherry Matthews

smatthews@clintonnc.com

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