UMO ag not your average classroom


Students with an interest in plants and gardening get their feet wet and their hands dirty in the utilization and development of the greenhouse and arboretum.


The UMO ag classroom can be a stage where ag students polish their public speaking skills.


An on-campus welding shop, provides a hands-on environment for students to learn and practice what they, themselves, will one day teach.


UMO students studying agriculture include, from left: Chris Hicks - Agricultural Education, Kinston; Janeice Leonard - Agricultural Education (Outreach & Extension) and Agricultural Production Systems, Lexington; Sarah Swain - Agricultural Education, Morehead City; James Johnson - Agricultural Education, Selma; Haley Bueing - Agricultural Education, Hope Mills; Ali Holton - Agricultural Education (Outreach & Extension) and Agricultural Production Systems, Linwood; Rachel Schauer - Agricultural Production Systems, Waxhaw; and Cody Langston - Agricultural Education, Newton Grove.


UMO students drive a gator-pulled train filled with third graders eager and anxious to learn about the food they eat and from where it comes.


MOUNT OLIVE — Forget four walls, at the University of Mount Olive, everything is fair game when it comes to learning spaces within the Department of Agriculture. Students get practical, hands-on experiences in environments that facilitate learning and emulate actual agricultural situations and practices.

Students studying agriculture learn from experienced faculty at our ever-developing Kornegay Student Farm. Literally from the ground up, students gain the actual skills and competencies related to the development of plant and animal production units.

Those students with an interest in plants and gardening get their feet wet and their hands dirty in the utilization and development of the greenhouse and arboretum. As students continually help to develop, design, and install plant materials at the arboretum and memorial garden, they learn about a diverse range of topics including sustainable horticulture, documentation, herbaria, propagation, and greenhouse management.

In the on-campus welding shop, students interested in ag education have a hands-on environment to learn and practice what they, themselves, will one day teach.

In addition, a UMO ag classroom can sometimes be a tent that houses more than 1,200 FFA members from across NC who visit campus for a day of fun, education, and interaction with UMO ag students. It can be a gator-pulled train filled with third graders eager and anxious to learn about the food they eat and where it comes from. It can be a local farm where students glean produce and learn about agriculture as they also provide produce to local food banks through community service projects. The UMO ag classroom can also be a stage where ag students polish their public speaking skills.

The UMO ag classroom is a living space embracing all aspects of agriculture. The UMO ag programs are active and engaging. The professors are enlightened and excited about leading the charge. The students are willing and ready to learn so that they can become agribusiness leaders, agricultural educators, farm managers, consultants, policy makers, and community servants. Every day provides different opportunities for UMO ag students to better understand and embrace the opportunities and challenges facing tomorrow’s agriculturalists. To find out what’s going on with UMO ag, visit umo.edu/ag.

Students with an interest in plants and gardening get their feet wet and their hands dirty in the utilization and development of the greenhouse and arboretum.
http://www.clintonnc.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/web1_UMO.jpgStudents with an interest in plants and gardening get their feet wet and their hands dirty in the utilization and development of the greenhouse and arboretum.

The UMO ag classroom can be a stage where ag students polish their public speaking skills.
http://www.clintonnc.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/web1_UMO2.jpgThe UMO ag classroom can be a stage where ag students polish their public speaking skills.

An on-campus welding shop, provides a hands-on environment for students to learn and practice what they, themselves, will one day teach.
http://www.clintonnc.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/web1_UMO3.jpgAn on-campus welding shop, provides a hands-on environment for students to learn and practice what they, themselves, will one day teach.

UMO students studying agriculture include, from left: Chris Hicks – Agricultural Education, Kinston; Janeice Leonard – Agricultural Education (Outreach & Extension) and Agricultural Production Systems, Lexington; Sarah Swain – Agricultural Education, Morehead City; James Johnson – Agricultural Education, Selma; Haley Bueing – Agricultural Education, Hope Mills; Ali Holton – Agricultural Education (Outreach & Extension) and Agricultural Production Systems, Linwood; Rachel Schauer – Agricultural Production Systems, Waxhaw; and Cody Langston – Agricultural Education, Newton Grove.
http://www.clintonnc.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/web1_UMO4.jpgUMO students studying agriculture include, from left: Chris Hicks – Agricultural Education, Kinston; Janeice Leonard – Agricultural Education (Outreach & Extension) and Agricultural Production Systems, Lexington; Sarah Swain – Agricultural Education, Morehead City; James Johnson – Agricultural Education, Selma; Haley Bueing – Agricultural Education, Hope Mills; Ali Holton – Agricultural Education (Outreach & Extension) and Agricultural Production Systems, Linwood; Rachel Schauer – Agricultural Production Systems, Waxhaw; and Cody Langston – Agricultural Education, Newton Grove.

UMO students drive a gator-pulled train filled with third graders eager and anxious to learn about the food they eat and from where it comes.
http://www.clintonnc.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/web1_UMO5.jpgUMO students drive a gator-pulled train filled with third graders eager and anxious to learn about the food they eat and from where it comes.
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