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Last updated: July 23. 2014 4:05PM -

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While educators don’t always get the support they deserve from state government, they certainly receive it from the local community, particularly as it pertains to individual citizens willing to go above and beyond to ensure that both our public and private schools are taken care of, be it helping to offset incurred costs or through time and talents volunteered.


You see it all the time from business and industry, from individuals and from parents.


That’s why it really comes as no surprise that a sizable endowment was recently added to the Jack and Kitty Morisey Teacher of the Year Awards Program in Clinton City Schools.


Though contributor and Sampson native Johnny Morrisey isn’t much on the accolades deserving of such a significant contribution, we felt it appropriate to offer him a sincere thank you for his generosity and his show of support to city schools educators.


Like city schools Teacher of the Year coordinator Jeff Swartz, we believe the program and the continuation of it for years to come offers a significant morale booster to educators who often feel like financial targets in the state’s budget battles. What’s more, because of the way the program is set up, the benefits reaped help not only the teachers but students, a win-win for everyone in the city schools district.


Because of the sizable contribution, $18,000 a year will be used annually for the Teacher of the Year program, with $2,000 awarded to each of the five school-level winners for their own use and an additional $3,000 for the system winner for their own use. The cherry atop those gifts is that $500 will go to each school-level winner to be used in their classroom and another $500 for the system winner to use in their classroom. And to make it an even grander award, $2,000 will be given to the system winner’s school to be used to further education there.


Those monies can be used for technology, books or other long-lasting items that will benefit all students in the school.


For Morisey, the contribution is a way to give back to the community where he grew up. According to Swartz and others, he doesn’t want special credit or accolades, but merely wants to see education and students thrive.


We believe both will thanks to the tremendous support of Morisey and so many more who give time, money and talents to ensure that Clinton City and Sampson County schools, as well as private educational institutions and even our great community college are given tools that help them succeed.


While it would be nice if legislators in our state’s capitol could show their support as easily as every day citizens do, it’s certainly nice to know that in our midst are people willing to go the extra mile to make education, and thus the support of it, a priority.


The difference it will make is enormous.


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