Last updated: April 03. 2014 3:47PM - 1331 Views
By - cberendt@civitasmedia.com



John Wood, landscape architect for Cline Design Associates in Raleigh, points out numerous design elements in Greenway Residential Development's proposed 72-unit apartment complex. The $6.5 million project, to be located off Overland Road, was approved unanimously by City Council earlier this week.
John Wood, landscape architect for Cline Design Associates in Raleigh, points out numerous design elements in Greenway Residential Development's proposed 72-unit apartment complex. The $6.5 million project, to be located off Overland Road, was approved unanimously by City Council earlier this week.
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With an expansion project for N.C. 24 on its way, the growth around the area is already happening. The latest in that boom around Sunset Avenue came with the City Council’s approval of a 72-unit apartment complex off Overland Road.


The Council unanimously approved a conditional use request by Greenway Residential Development, LLC to construct the 72-unit apartment complex along the 400 block of Overland Road, on 12.6 acres in a RA-20 Residential Agriculture District.


With the approval, permitting and preliminary work is expected to continue through 2014 with construction commencing at the beginning of 2015. The project is set to be complete in 2016.


Harold Pollock of Pollock & Pollock Attorneys At Law of Burgaw, legal counsel for Greenway Residential Development, LLC, praised the project before engineers, designers and the company’s owner spoke to the particulars.


“This is a very open apartment complex. It’s very appealing,” said Pollock, who is originally from Indiantown Road. He said he has watched his home county grow over the years, specifically around N.C. 24, and pointed to Greenway’s request as being another positive step in that expansion. “I think this type of apartment complex is going to fit in very nicely with what is going on out there.”


It is safe, affordable, well-maintained and well-kept, Pollock said.


John Wood, landscape architect for Cline Design Associates in Raleigh, said there would be 4 to 5 foot vinyl fences around the sediment pond, security lights on the rear of the buildings and the location of the required fire hydrants along Overland Road.


The 72 units in six buildings would be focused around a common open space and a one-story community center, which would include a meeting space, leasing office, 24-hour business center, exercise and laundry facilities. Just outside that center would be a fenced-in playground area as well as a gazebo and outdoor grilling area. Sidewalks would interconnect around the complex, which would also have dumpsters and recycling area. Each unit would have a covered porch and about two parking spaces, on average.


Landscaping “exceeds the requirements” and there is an extensive amount of natural buffer, Wood said. Clinton-Sampson Planning director Mary Rose concurred that the proposed site included a “considerable amount of buffer,” which will have to be maintained.


Wood said, of the 12.6 acres, about half of that is going to be retained as undisturbed vegetation. He said the proposed Clinton project was similar to Autumn Oaks in Sanford.


“We’ve had an opportunity to work on these in Knightdale, Sanford and Shallotte, so there is a good track record of high-quality construction,” he said.


Greenway Residential Development has developed over 20 multi-family projects totaling over 2,000 units in North Carolina, South Carolina and Virginia.


Mayor Lew Starling asked whether Greenway planned to operate the development once built or if they would be selling. Since 1993, Greenway owner Brad Parker said, he has not sold any projects.


“We are not a merchant builder,” Parker attested. “We have long-term investors for these properties and our own construction company. We use very high-end elements on the facade. It’s really built to last, so we can wait 20-some years before we have to start doing (heavy maintenance).”


Councilman Steve Stefanovich praised the proposal.


“I’m impressed with what I see,” said Stefanovich, citing the plans and the location. “There certainly is a need in our community for this.”


Parker said the proposed project is valued at $6.5 million.


Taxes are currently $320 a month on the tract. It is estimated that the property, once developed, would bring annual taxes to the City of Clinton at about a hundred times that — roughly $32,000, Pollock noted.


The City of Clinton Technical Review Committee, which includes local planning, fire, police and public works officials, included recommendations that were noted in the final plan. That included adding fences to surround the lift station and retention pond, as well as moving the sidewalk from the interior of the property to become adjacent to Overland Road.


Increased lighting was recommended at the request of Police Chief Jay Tilley toward the interior of the development and to the rear of all buildings.


The developer will continue to work with City Public Works in order to accomplish necessary water and sewer extension.


Ryan Stephenson, P.E., Regional Manager with Ramey Kemp & Associates, Inc. of Raleigh said the apartment complex would generate about one trip per minute during peak traffic time at 5 p.m., about 57 cars per hour. N.C. Department of Transportation does not require a turn lane at the site entrance, Stephenson said.


Rose said Greenway’s desire to get city water and sewer service, adjacent to the city limits, would require Greenway to petition for voluntary annexation.


Public Works director Jeff Vreugdenhil said a force main would have to be installed and the sewer would have to be pumped all the way back from N.C. 24 due to the lack of gravity sewer. The water will be pulled from the elevated tank. The city will co-sign on the applications and Greenway will front all the cost for the installations needed.


The Council unanimously found that the request met the four requirements for conditional use, including that the request will not endanger public health or safety or substantially injure the adjoining property values, and that it will be in harmony with the area and in general conformity with the Land Development Ordinance.


“I think it’s absolutely the best use of this property,” the attorney said. “For the seniors who live there it’s very convenient for them to do their shopping. People on fixed incomes, seniors and young professionals, can have a place to live that is nice and beautiful.”


Chris Berendt can be reached at 910-592-8137 ext. 121 or via email at cberendt@civitasmedia.com.

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