Last updated: September 18. 2013 4:32PM
Lauren Williams Staff Writer



Lauren Williams/Sampson IndependentDue to bridge preservation work, both lanes of Indian Town Road will be intermittently closed beginning Monday, Sept. 23 at 8 a.m.
Lauren Williams/Sampson IndependentDue to bridge preservation work, both lanes of Indian Town Road will be intermittently closed beginning Monday, Sept. 23 at 8 a.m.
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Starting next week, motorists traveling down Indian Town Road (SR 1226) in Clinton will need to be watchful of intermittent lane closures due to bridge preservation work.


According to Department of Transportation bridge project engineer Sean Carter, the Ralph Hodge Construction Company has been awarded the contract for the needed preservation work and is scheduled to begin making the improvements to the bridge at 8 a.m. Monday, Sept. 23. The job is expected to last a couple of weeks, through Friday, Oct. 4 at 5 p.m.


“Provided there are no weather delays, the schedule should follow that pretty closely,” said Carter.


The preservation work being done on the bridge, which crosses over the US 421/US 701 bypass, will primarily involve the application of a latex overlay.


Carter described the 46-year-old bridge as “not in disrepair” but “needing some repairs to extend the life of the bridge.”


Many other bridges around Sampson County have also undergone similar preservation work, noted Carter, but most had received an epoxy, not latex, overlay.


“More (than an epoxy overlay) is needed with this bridge. We need to go beyond that, deeper than that,” explained Carter. “We need to remove an inch of contaminated concrete.”


Salt, gasoline, and oil are among the contaminants that can adversely affect and contribute to the deterioration of bridges over time, Carter added.


“Over time concrete cracks and even the tiniest crack will allow fluids to get down in there,” he continued. “It’s kind of like painting your house. If you don’t keep it painted, over time it just wears off.”


Once the contaminated concrete is removed, “it will be replaced with new and improved concrete,” Carter said, noting that the new latex overlay “should last a good 15 to 20 years.”


Fore more information, please visit http://www.ncdot.gov.


Lauren Williams can be reached at 910-592-8137, ext. 117 or via email at lwilliams@civitasmedia.com.

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