Camera shows students a different world

By Sherry Matthews - [email protected]
Sampson Community College Digital Do’s and Don’ts student Emily Daughtridge called this photo ‘First Kiss,’ selected it as one of her five best for the class because, she said, it offered examples of many of the things she had learned during the 10-week course. The photo, taken on a lake, shows a silhoutte of a couple sneaking their first kiss. She thought the photo was good, she said, ‘because it showed the love between the couple.’ -
Taken from the balcony of her apartment, student Brandi Johnson selected ‘Full Moon’ as one of her top 5 because of the detail and texture the photograph offered. She used auto focus on her camera to capture the moon one night late in April. -
Lighting and action were keys to this picture Dr. Beth Bryan aptly titled ‘Fetch.’ She was able to capture the dog in action as it ran after a ball in her backyard. Of all the things she said she learned in the Digital Do’s class, taking lots of pictures and always having your camera around were key. -
Using this bright red N.C. State Wolfpack Azalea as the focal point and blurring her background, student Angela Potts captured the beauty of spring and showed off the importance of light in photography. She said she chose this photo as one of her top 5 for the class because of the blurred background she was able to get even as she focused in on the deep red of the flower. - -
Light, focus and detail are the things that caught photography student Theresa Jacobs’ eye about her photo simply called ‘Honeysuckle.’ Taken at White Lake a few weeks back, Jacobs said she selected the photo because of the details in it and the contrasting colors that allowed the photograph to ‘pop.’ - -
On a field trip to the home of former SCC photography instructor Gloria Edwards, Digital Do’s student Dennis Westbrook used skillful framing to capture the solitude of a gazebo flanked by the beauty of spring azaleas. The photo, taken in late afternoon, showed, Westbrook said, just how peaceful the afternoon was. He chose the photo, he said, because he liked the way the bushes framed the structure. - -

(Editor’s note: This is the first in a three-part series of photos provided from the Digital Do’s and Don’t class at Sampson Community College. More photos will appear in the next two Weekend Editions of The Sampson Independent)

Cameras slung on their shoulders and eyes scanning their surroundings, over a dozen Sampson Community College photography students descended on their destination, armed with a desire to capture some of the best pictures they’d taken during their nearly 10 weeks in the Digital Do’s and Don’ts class taught by Sebrinia Johnson.

They made their way into the azalea-laden yard of former photography instructor Gloria Edwards back in April, ready to take instruction from Johnson even as they honed in on the subjects they most wanted to take during one of the many field trips they’d been on during the class.

“Just look around you and shoot,” Johnson said, as the students lifted their cameras and divided, prepared to conquer the yard and its wonders.

Some honed in on upclose shots of the azaleas; others stood back and tried to frame their photos, each trying to capture a moment, a memory and a scene, just as Johnson had been teaching them during their classes.

Their excitement was palpable.

“Look at this,” Angela Potts exclaimed as she reviewed her latest shot on the camera’s screen.

The photograph popped with color, the red azalea clearly the focal point with the background blurred just as she had hoped.

“Great job,” Johnson offered, as she observed her student’s work, before being pulled away to appraise another shot from yet another budding photographer.

Digital Do’s and Don’ts, the first of three photography levels taught at SCC (Shutterbugs 2 and 3 are taught by instructor Kelly Jones), is offered spring and fall and is open to anyone with a desire to learn both about the cameras they’ve purchased and how to use them to bring the world to life right before their very eyes. Next fall the first level class name will change to Shutterbugs 1.

The 10-week class has opened the world to many students, all who are quick to point out that after taking their first photography class they see the world far differently.

“The class was a lot of fun for me and, I think, for the students, too,” Johnson noted. “Everyone worked together very well, and the students made a lot of progress from the beginning. They really enjoyed getting to know their cameras and practicing new concepts.”

Students concurred with Johnson’s assessment.

“You just learn so much,” Potts noted during the final night of class, when students were urged to pick out their 5 best photographs, one of which was selected by judges as each students’ best of the best.

Trying to sum up the class and what she learned, Potts pointed out the rule of thirds as one of the many valuable lessons she walked away with, though by far not the only one. “You just see thing differently when you start looking at taking a picture.”

“I learned all the ways to frame a picture and what makes a good picture,” student Angie Naylor said. “I just thoroughly enjoyed this class; Sebrinia did a great job as our teacher.”

Those sentiments were shared by the large class of students, all who touted Johnson and the skills they were able to learn under her tutelage.

“I learned a great deal from this class,” said Deborah Grant. “For instance, you have got to take about a thousand pictures to get 50 good ones. You have to learn to be patient and enjoy the moment.”

And, of course, there were lessons like turning off the flash, the rule of thirds and stopping and looking around you.

“I see things differently now,” Dennis Westbrook admitted. “Taking this class literally opened my eyes.”

Sampson Community College Digital Do’s and Don’ts student Emily Daughtridge called this photo ‘First Kiss,’ selected it as one of her five best for the class because, she said, it offered examples of many of the things she had learned during the 10-week course. The photo, taken on a lake, shows a silhoutte of a couple sneaking their first kiss. She thought the photo was good, she said, ‘because it showed the love between the couple.’
https://www.clintonnc.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/web1_Emily-Daughtridge.jpgSampson Community College Digital Do’s and Don’ts student Emily Daughtridge called this photo ‘First Kiss,’ selected it as one of her five best for the class because, she said, it offered examples of many of the things she had learned during the 10-week course. The photo, taken on a lake, shows a silhoutte of a couple sneaking their first kiss. She thought the photo was good, she said, ‘because it showed the love between the couple.’

Taken from the balcony of her apartment, student Brandi Johnson selected ‘Full Moon’ as one of her top 5 because of the detail and texture the photograph offered. She used auto focus on her camera to capture the moon one night late in April.
https://www.clintonnc.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/web1_Brandi-Johnson.jpgTaken from the balcony of her apartment, student Brandi Johnson selected ‘Full Moon’ as one of her top 5 because of the detail and texture the photograph offered. She used auto focus on her camera to capture the moon one night late in April.

Lighting and action were keys to this picture Dr. Beth Bryan aptly titled ‘Fetch.’ She was able to capture the dog in action as it ran after a ball in her backyard. Of all the things she said she learned in the Digital Do’s class, taking lots of pictures and always having your camera around were key.
https://www.clintonnc.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/web1_Beth-Bryan.jpgLighting and action were keys to this picture Dr. Beth Bryan aptly titled ‘Fetch.’ She was able to capture the dog in action as it ran after a ball in her backyard. Of all the things she said she learned in the Digital Do’s class, taking lots of pictures and always having your camera around were key.

Using this bright red N.C. State Wolfpack Azalea as the focal point and blurring her background, student Angela Potts captured the beauty of spring and showed off the importance of light in photography. She said she chose this photo as one of her top 5 for the class because of the blurred background she was able to get even as she focused in on the deep red of the flower.
https://www.clintonnc.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/web1_Angela-Potts.jpgUsing this bright red N.C. State Wolfpack Azalea as the focal point and blurring her background, student Angela Potts captured the beauty of spring and showed off the importance of light in photography. She said she chose this photo as one of her top 5 for the class because of the blurred background she was able to get even as she focused in on the deep red of the flower.

Light, focus and detail are the things that caught photography student Theresa Jacobs’ eye about her photo simply called ‘Honeysuckle.’ Taken at White Lake a few weeks back, Jacobs said she selected the photo because of the details in it and the contrasting colors that allowed the photograph to ‘pop.’
https://www.clintonnc.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/web1_Teresa-Jacobs.jpgLight, focus and detail are the things that caught photography student Theresa Jacobs’ eye about her photo simply called ‘Honeysuckle.’ Taken at White Lake a few weeks back, Jacobs said she selected the photo because of the details in it and the contrasting colors that allowed the photograph to ‘pop.’

On a field trip to the home of former SCC photography instructor Gloria Edwards, Digital Do’s student Dennis Westbrook used skillful framing to capture the solitude of a gazebo flanked by the beauty of spring azaleas. The photo, taken in late afternoon, showed, Westbrook said, just how peaceful the afternoon was. He chose the photo, he said, because he liked the way the bushes framed the structure.
https://www.clintonnc.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/web1_Dennis-Westbrook.jpgOn a field trip to the home of former SCC photography instructor Gloria Edwards, Digital Do’s student Dennis Westbrook used skillful framing to capture the solitude of a gazebo flanked by the beauty of spring azaleas. The photo, taken in late afternoon, showed, Westbrook said, just how peaceful the afternoon was. He chose the photo, he said, because he liked the way the bushes framed the structure.
Through pictures, Digital Do’s students show some of what they’ve learned

By Sherry Matthews

[email protected]