From the eye of the photographer

Calling her photo simply ‘Hope,’ Digital Do’s and Don’ts student Sharron Batchelor said she chose this picture for one of her final exam shots because of the beauty it captured, particularly the sunrays over the ocean, which showed up after a storm. ‘The photo reminded me of a Karen Kingsbury poem,’ Batchelor said. The poem, in part, reads ‘…Today there were possibilities that God had only just now begun to present … blue skies appearing on the horizon that had never been there before…’ -
Paige Cavanaugh learned how to capture details while taking the Digital Do’s class and she used what she learned to capture this photograph called ‘Meadow dance,’ a picture that captures a young girl’s playful movements in a neighbor’s field. -
Blurring her background and getting close up to her subject, Kristina Wilson was able to get a picture of a raindrop on a flower’s leaf. She took the picture after a rain shower and she aptly titled the photograph ‘After the rain,’ because, she said, it was the drop of rain that made her like the picture so much. ‘I really liked the way that drop of rain was in focus,’ she attested. -
Pam Westbrook’s love of a grandchild was the focal point of this picture she entitled ‘A little boy and his Papa.’ The photo, she pointed out, tells a story without words. Showing her grandson playing in the yard with his grandpa, the photo captures a moment in time. Westbrook said since taking the class she has learned ‘to see the world differently; I see things I’d been missing because I’m looking harder.’ - -
Student Crystal Bradshaw likes the way she can make a photography ‘artsy’ just by the positioning, something she worked on with this photograph she called ‘Country love,’ a picture of a vintage pair of books positioned at the top into a heart shape. That, she said, is what she loved best about the photo. She took the class to learn more about photography and she came away with many lessons learned, including, she said, lighting and settings. - -
Using black and white photography to capture a selfie, Vydie West called her picture ‘Always behind the camera’ simply because, she said, that’s where she was. The class, she said, taught her many things, the most of important of which was how to position herself to get the very best shot. ‘It’s the small things that often become art. That was something else I learned.’ - -

Calling her photo simply ‘Hope,’ Digital Do’s and Don’ts student Sharron Batchelor said she chose this picture for one of her final exam shots because of the beauty it captured, particularly the sunrays over the ocean, which showed up after a storm. ‘The photo reminded me of a Karen Kingsbury poem,’ Batchelor said. The poem, in part, reads ‘…Today there were possibilities that God had only just now begun to present … blue skies appearing on the horizon that had never been there before…’

Paige Cavanaugh learned how to capture details while taking the Digital Do’s class and she used what she learned to capture this photograph called ‘Meadow dance,’ a picture that captures a young girl’s playful movements in a neighbor’s field.

Blurring her background and getting close up to her subject, Kristina Wilson was able to get a picture of a raindrop on a flower’s leaf. She took the picture after a rain shower and she aptly titled the photograph ‘After the rain,’ because, she said, it was the drop of rain that made her like the picture so much. ‘I really liked the way that drop of rain was in focus,’ she attested.

Pam Westbrook’s love of a grandchild was the focal point of this picture she entitled ‘A little boy and his Papa.’ The photo, she pointed out, tells a story without words. Showing her grandson playing in the yard with his grandpa, the photo captures a moment in time. Westbrook said since taking the class she has learned ‘to see the world differently; I see things I’d been missing because I’m looking harder.’

Student Crystal Bradshaw likes the way she can make a photography ‘artsy’ just by the positioning, something she worked on with this photograph she called ‘Country love,’ a picture of a vintage pair of books positioned at the top into a heart shape. That, she said, is what she loved best about the photo. She took the class to learn more about photography and she came away with many lessons learned, including, she said, lighting and settings.

Using black and white photography to capture a selfie, Vydie West called her picture ‘Always behind the camera’ simply because, she said, that’s where she was. The class, she said, taught her many things, the most of important of which was how to position herself to get the very best shot. ‘It’s the small things that often become art. That was something else I learned.’

Calling her photo simply ‘Hope,’ Digital Do’s and Don’ts student Sharron Batchelor said she chose this picture for one of her final exam shots because of the beauty it captured, particularly the sunrays over the ocean, which showed up after a storm. ‘The photo reminded me of a Karen Kingsbury poem,’ Batchelor said. The poem, in part, reads ‘…Today there were possibilities that God had only just now begun to present … blue skies appearing on the horizon that had never been there before…’
https://www.clintonnc.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/web1_Sharon-Batchelor.jpgCalling her photo simply ‘Hope,’ Digital Do’s and Don’ts student Sharron Batchelor said she chose this picture for one of her final exam shots because of the beauty it captured, particularly the sunrays over the ocean, which showed up after a storm. ‘The photo reminded me of a Karen Kingsbury poem,’ Batchelor said. The poem, in part, reads ‘…Today there were possibilities that God had only just now begun to present … blue skies appearing on the horizon that had never been there before…’

Paige Cavanaugh learned how to capture details while taking the Digital Do’s class and she used what she learned to capture this photograph called ‘Meadow dance,’ a picture that captures a young girl’s playful movements in a neighbor’s field.
https://www.clintonnc.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/web1_Paige-Cavenaugh.jpgPaige Cavanaugh learned how to capture details while taking the Digital Do’s class and she used what she learned to capture this photograph called ‘Meadow dance,’ a picture that captures a young girl’s playful movements in a neighbor’s field.

Blurring her background and getting close up to her subject, Kristina Wilson was able to get a picture of a raindrop on a flower’s leaf. She took the picture after a rain shower and she aptly titled the photograph ‘After the rain,’ because, she said, it was the drop of rain that made her like the picture so much. ‘I really liked the way that drop of rain was in focus,’ she attested.
https://www.clintonnc.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/web1_Kristina-Wilson.jpegBlurring her background and getting close up to her subject, Kristina Wilson was able to get a picture of a raindrop on a flower’s leaf. She took the picture after a rain shower and she aptly titled the photograph ‘After the rain,’ because, she said, it was the drop of rain that made her like the picture so much. ‘I really liked the way that drop of rain was in focus,’ she attested.

Pam Westbrook’s love of a grandchild was the focal point of this picture she entitled ‘A little boy and his Papa.’ The photo, she pointed out, tells a story without words. Showing her grandson playing in the yard with his grandpa, the photo captures a moment in time. Westbrook said since taking the class she has learned ‘to see the world differently; I see things I’d been missing because I’m looking harder.’
https://www.clintonnc.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/web1_Pam-Westbrook.jpgPam Westbrook’s love of a grandchild was the focal point of this picture she entitled ‘A little boy and his Papa.’ The photo, she pointed out, tells a story without words. Showing her grandson playing in the yard with his grandpa, the photo captures a moment in time. Westbrook said since taking the class she has learned ‘to see the world differently; I see things I’d been missing because I’m looking harder.’

Student Crystal Bradshaw likes the way she can make a photography ‘artsy’ just by the positioning, something she worked on with this photograph she called ‘Country love,’ a picture of a vintage pair of books positioned at the top into a heart shape. That, she said, is what she loved best about the photo. She took the class to learn more about photography and she came away with many lessons learned, including, she said, lighting and settings.
https://www.clintonnc.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/web1_Crystal-Bradshaw.jpgStudent Crystal Bradshaw likes the way she can make a photography ‘artsy’ just by the positioning, something she worked on with this photograph she called ‘Country love,’ a picture of a vintage pair of books positioned at the top into a heart shape. That, she said, is what she loved best about the photo. She took the class to learn more about photography and she came away with many lessons learned, including, she said, lighting and settings.

Using black and white photography to capture a selfie, Vydie West called her picture ‘Always behind the camera’ simply because, she said, that’s where she was. The class, she said, taught her many things, the most of important of which was how to position herself to get the very best shot. ‘It’s the small things that often become art. That was something else I learned.’
https://www.clintonnc.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/web1_Vydie-West.jpgUsing black and white photography to capture a selfie, Vydie West called her picture ‘Always behind the camera’ simply because, she said, that’s where she was. The class, she said, taught her many things, the most of important of which was how to position herself to get the very best shot. ‘It’s the small things that often become art. That was something else I learned.’
First-time photography students turn cameras to the world