Sampson Independent

Museum adds Grange exhibit

The Sampson County History Museum recently celebrated a new addition to its agriculture exhibit.

With support from local community members, the South River Pomona Grange No. 76 and Union High School (UHS) presented a joint service project for the museum’s Grange Agriculture Museum. During the recent event, two new display cabinets and historical Grange items were presented.

Remarks were provided by FFA Advisor and Teacher Dan Chabot; Chris Woodson, director of the museum; and Jimmy Gentry N.C. State Grange president.

“This project was a great partnership between the Grange, FFA and the museum,” Gentry stated in a news release. “It has provided us the opportunity to display artifacts related to the Grange among exhibits that highlight our agricultural heritage. North Carolina Grange is fortunate to have been a part in this endeavor.”

Plaques were presented to Carlton Barefoot and Rep. Dr. Larry M. Bell, for their support to to the organization. The South River Pomona Grange also donated a $250 check to Woodson and museum for the military building project.

“We’re real pleased with it,” Woodson said about the assistance. “The community response has been great as far as helping out with the new building and having the local Grange involved. It’s been a big help.”

The project at the agriculture unit started as a goal from Zipporah Hayes, UHS FFA president and Grange member. Students learned cabinet making and the state’s agriculture history.

“We’re real happy to have the FFA students involved as well,” Woodson said about connecting with local schools for projects at the museum.

Raymond Hayes, president of the South River Pomona Grange, shared the same feelings.

“I feel it was a wonderful joint venture and we will explore more ways the two organizations can work together in the future,” Hayes said.

Some of the artifacts included antique books dating back to the 1920s about agriculture, a model tractor trailer from the N.C. Department of Agriculture, a Holy Bible and a sesquicentennial coin.

“The building is a big part of Sampson County’s history because of local agriculture and the economy,” Woodson said. “We’ve got artifacts dating all the way back to the 1800s on farming and things of that nature.”

The Sampson County History Museum is located at 313 Lisbon St., Clinton. It is open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Thursday through Saturday.

Raymond Hayes, president of the South River Pomona Grange, makes a presentation to museum officials and supporters.
https://www.clintonnc.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/web1_Grange__1.jpgRaymond Hayes, president of the South River Pomona Grange, makes a presentation to museum officials and supporters.
South River Pomona Grange No. 76 donated items to the Sampson County History Museum. (Courtesy Photo)
https://www.clintonnc.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/web1_Grange__3.jpgSouth River Pomona Grange No. 76 donated items to the Sampson County History Museum. (Courtesy Photo)
FFA student Jeremy Powell; Raymond Hayes, president of the South River Pomona Grange; and FFA Union High School President Zipporah Hayes present cabinets to the history museum. (Courtesy Photo)
https://www.clintonnc.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/web1_Grange__2.jpgFFA student Jeremy Powell; Raymond Hayes, president of the South River Pomona Grange; and FFA Union High School President Zipporah Hayes present cabinets to the history museum. (Courtesy Photo)

By Chase Jordan

cjordan@clintonnc.com

About the Grange

Grange is an English word that means grain, granary, farm, farmhouse or an association of farmers. The North Carolina State Grange, incorporated Feb. 20, 1875, was successful in various legislative activities such as railroad regulation. Following World War I and the development of the Department of Agriculture as a strong advocate for farmers, the Grange’s prominence fell slightly. As a result of the Great Depression and a need for a greater sense of community, the Grange re-organized in 1929. By bringing isolated farm families together, it fostered community spirit and encouraged greater tolerance among people who belonged to different political parties and religious denominations. The Grange provided valuable business training through cooperative buying and selling among Grange members. It also maintained a lively interest in education which is evident by the fact that community and local Granges sometimes undertook the operation of primary schools and high schools. The Grange was instrumental in the development of 4-H and Future Farmers of America.

The Grange Today

The North Carolina State Grange serves as a family-oriented organization committed to serving its members through a variety of programs and services. The Grange still promotes agriculture as an essential industry for our economy. Grassroots involvement in governmental issues is promoted through the development of legislative policy and through the encouragement of political participation. The State Grange and local Granges provide educational and wholesome social opportunities. One of the greatest benefits of being a Grange member is this fellowship. Local Granges are active in improving their communities through service projects and volunteerism. Developing leadership skills for youth is essential for equipping our future’s leaders with the ability to make our state, nation and world a better place in which to live.

— South River Pomona Grange No. 76