Sampson Independent

N.C. Pesticide Board announces settlements

RALEIGH — The N.C. Pesticide Board recently approved the following settlement agreements for individuals in Brunswick, Craven, Duplin, Forsyth, Haywood, Lee, Nash, Sampson, Wayne and Wilson counties. Settlements involved instances of pesticide drift, violations of worker protection standards and selling restricted-use pesticides to individuals who did not have a valid pesticide license.

The board also issued a ruling in a formal hearing against Mamie W. Ellis of Ellis and Ellis Ornamental and Turf and Ellis and Ellis Pest Control of Greenville. Ellis was found in violation of the N.C. Pesticide law and was issued a civil penalty of $3,000 and had her commercial pesticide applicator licensed revoked for two years. Violations included inadequate record keeping and using agricultural pesticides to treat residential property.

Settlements are listed by county below:

(Brunswick) Clint W. Bryant, pesticide applicator and superintendent for Lion’s Paw and Panther Run golf courses in Ocean Isle Beach, agreed to pay $800 for using a pesticide in a manner inconsistent with its labeling. The pesticide used to treat the Bermuda grass at the golf courses stated on the label “do not use on athletic fields, golf courses, residential or turf farms.”

(Brunswick) In a related settlement, Robert Scott Deans, pesticide applicator and superintendent for Leopard’s Chase golf course in Ocean Isle Beach, agreed to pay $800 for using the same pesticide in a manner inconsistent with its labeling at Leopard’s Chase golf course.

(Craven) Timothy A. Stancill of Dover agreed to pay $600 for drift damage to a neighboring yard from a pesticide application to a peanut field. N.C. law states that no person shall apply pesticides under such conditions that drift from pesticide particles or vapors results in adverse effects.

(Craven) Brian Ray Haddock of Vanceboro agreed to pay $900 for drift damage to a neighboring yard from a pesticide application to a peanut field. N.C. law states that no person shall apply pesticides under such conditions that drift from pesticide particles or vapors results in adverse effects.

(Duplin) John J. Odom of Odom Farms in Seven Springs agreed to pay $1,000 for drift damage to a neighboring property from a pesticide application to a watermelon field. N.C. law states that no person shall apply pesticides under such conditions that drift from pesticide particles or vapors results in adverse effects.

(Forsyth) JRM, Inc, a corporation registered to do business in North Carolina, agreed to pay $2,400 for having restricted-use pesticides for sale without holding a valid pesticide dealers license. The company also sold restricted-use pesticides to individuals that did not hold a pesticide license or private applicator certification.

(Forsyth) Scott R. Saintsing of Outdoor Exposure in High Point, agreed to pay $800 for engaging in the business of pesticide applicator without a pesticide applicator license.

(Haywood) Joseph C. Kinsland of Canton agreed to pay $600 for drift damage to a neighboring yard from a pesticide application to a pasture. N.C. law states that no person shall apply pesticides under such conditions that drift from pesticide particles or vapors results in adverse effects.

(Lee) Randy Lee Lanier, pesticide applicator for Tri-River Lawn Care in Sanford, agreed to pay $800 for drift damage to a soybean field from a pesticide application to a cell phone tower station. N.C. law states that no person shall apply pesticides under such conditions that drift from pesticide particles or vapors results in adverse effects.

(Nash) Louis Peele, licensed pesticide dealer for Select Source in Middlesex, agreed to pay $800 for selling restricted-use pesticides to JRM, Inc during the years of 2015 through 2017. JRM was not properly licensed to purchase these products.

(Sampson) James E. Godwin, owner of JEG Farms in Newton Grove, agreed to pay $1,200 for drift damage to a neighboring garden from a pesticide application to an agricultural field. N.C. law states that no person shall apply pesticides under such conditions that drift from pesticide particles or vapors results in adverse effects.

(Wayne) Gerald B. Ballance of Ballance Farms in Fremont, agreed to pay $1,000 for Worker Protection Standards violations at his farms. Ballance allowed H-2A farmworkers to enter pesticide treated areas during the 12-hour restricted-entry period.

(Wilson) Bennie R. Whitehurst of Conetoe agreed to pay $600 for drift damage to a tobacco field from a pesticide application to a dicamba-resistant soybean field. N.C. law states that no person shall apply pesticides under such conditions that drift from pesticide particles or vapors results in adverse effects.

Sampson, Duplin cases involved