SCC course hits highest-ever female enrollment

By Dan Grubb - Sampson Community College
This year’s class has more female students than ever. Pictured are Jacob Sasser, Benjamin Green, Cory Sturdevant, Britnie Adams, Tyler Sparling, Earl Elam, Jocelyn Corbett, Kenia Valdez, Ashley Strickland, Sharnett Peterson, Italia Harlan, Avigail Cruz and Diana Prado. -

When you find yourself in an emergency and need help, you don’t have time to care about whether the person who comes to your aid is male or female, you just need the help. Apparently, students enrolling in Sampson Community College’s Basic Law Enforcement Training course have gotten the message.

“This is very significant,” says Jennifer Wiley, Basic Law Enforcement Training Director for the college. “We have more females in this class than we have ever had in a single BLET class in the history of SCC. It is a wonderful opportunity for a great career for male and female candidates. I served eight years serving the Department of Public Safety in Raleigh, so there is no reason for anyone to be shy about training.”

Clinton Police Department’s Assistant Chief Anthony Davis agrees.

“It doesn’t matter what your gender, race or ethnicity is,” he says. “We need people who want to better the community, who want to help the community. Ultimately, it’s about fighting crime and making our area a better place and help citizens live a better life.”

The BLET course prepares entry-level individuals with the skills needed to become certified law enforcement officers in North Carolina. Upon successful completion of the BLET State Comprehensive Written Examination, the trainee has one year from the date of the State Comprehensive Examination to be appointed and sworn as a law enforcement officer in North Carolina. Most agencies will also include an additional period of field training as well.

“You can’t be intimidated,” says Britnie Adams, one of the newest BLET students. “It doesn’t matter if there are 10 times more men in the same job as you. We all go through the same training.”

Adams, who has a bachelor’s degree in criminal justice and forensic science, fell in love with forensic science and became interested in police work as a result. “I loved science, I loved figuring things out. Forensics led me into law enforcement. Now I want to use that science to solve crimes.”

“I loved science, I loved figuring things out. Forensics led me into law enforcement. Now I want to use that science to solve crimes.”

The course is comprised of 36 separate blocks of instruction to include topics such as Firearms, Driver Training, Motor Vehicle Law, and Arrest, Search and Seizure. The course is filled with practical exercises and an extensive ethics section that is woven throughout the training experience. The BLET course has the most current law enforcement information available. The Commission mandated 616-hour course takes approximately 16 weeks to complete and concludes with a comprehensive written exam and skills testing.

“I chose this profession so I can make a difference,” says Ashley Strickland, new BLET student. “I want to protect people and serve as a role model to young kids in the community. If there are other young girls out there thinking about it, I can tell them that you are strong and you are independent. You can do anything you put your mind to. Be headstrong and you can reach your goals!”

SCC’s BLET program will start a day class in January. For those interested in more information about BLET, contact Sharon West at [email protected] or at 910-900-4106.

This year’s class has more female students than ever. Pictured are Jacob Sasser, Benjamin Green, Cory Sturdevant, Britnie Adams, Tyler Sparling, Earl Elam, Jocelyn Corbett, Kenia Valdez, Ashley Strickland, Sharnett Peterson, Italia Harlan, Avigail Cruz and Diana Prado.
https://www.clintonnc.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/web1_BLETclass-2.jpgThis year’s class has more female students than ever. Pictured are Jacob Sasser, Benjamin Green, Cory Sturdevant, Britnie Adams, Tyler Sparling, Earl Elam, Jocelyn Corbett, Kenia Valdez, Ashley Strickland, Sharnett Peterson, Italia Harlan, Avigail Cruz and Diana Prado.

By Dan Grubb

Sampson Community College