Nuttle — making an impression

By Chase Jordan - [email protected]
Medrith Nuttle talks about her work displayed at the Small House. -
Creations from artist Medrith Nuttle are displayed at the Small House. -
Creations from artist Medrith Nuttle are displayed at the Small House. -

As an artist, Medrith Nuttle loves using acrylic paint to put masterpieces on canvases inside her studio or outside with Mother Nature.

During a recent reception hosted by the Sampson Arts Council, Nuttle showed everyone how it all comes together.

“I’m an Impressionist,” Nuttle said. “I’m very influenced by the old French impressionists.”

Since the young age of 12, Impressionism has been her chosen style. Developed in the 19th century, it includes short brush stokes of bright colors and depiction of light on objects. Her parents took her to the Columbus Gallery of Art, where she was amazed by paintings from Claude Monet and Pierre-Auguste Renoir.

“Monet is my hero,” she said. “I’m not in his league obviously, but I love him.”

Nuttle said she was delighted with the beauty and impressed how the artist expressed themselves. From that moment, her journey began. Along with brushes, Nuttle also uses knives to craft her work. Her husband, Keith Nuttle, also assist by taking scenic pictures and pictures of her canvases for competitions.

“I will paint just about anything that holds still, somethings that won’t because I’m fast,” she said.

She has more than 50 years of experience, which began in Ohio, where she grew up. After graduating from high school, Nuttle attended Columbus College of Art and Design and Cleveland Institute of Art. During her studies in the 1960s, the age of Abstract Expressionism, Op, and Pop, representational paintings was discouraged. This also included the “old-fashioned” style of Impressionism. She got away from the style for a while, but it came back.

As an artist, her goal is to show people how a subject looks to her and how she feels about it. She hopes people enjoying looking at her creations. Nuttle believe arts is essential for society.

“It’s as important in some ways to science, math or farming,” she said. “Obviously people are not going to die if they don’t have art, but they are going to be bored and things will not be as pretty.”

Work from the award-winning artist was featured in national, regional, and local juried competitions. One of those juried shows was hosted by the local arts council. Kara Donatelli, executive director of the Arts Council, is encouraging to come see her art displayed throughout the Small House.

“We had a great turnout out for the art reception tonight, so we’re very grateful for the community coming for out and supporting Medrith Nuttle,” Donatelli said.

Nuttle’s work will be available to the public for several weeks at the Victor R. Small House, 709 College St., Clinton. The work will be available to the public through Thursday, Feb. 20. Gallery hours are 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. and 3 to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Friday. Appointments may also be made by calling 910-596-2533. For more information, visit www.sampsonarts.net

Medrith Nuttle talks about her work displayed at the Small House.
https://www.clintonnc.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/01/web1_Nuttle-__1.jpgMedrith Nuttle talks about her work displayed at the Small House.

Creations from artist Medrith Nuttle are displayed at the Small House.
https://www.clintonnc.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/01/web1_Nuttle__2.jpgCreations from artist Medrith Nuttle are displayed at the Small House.

Creations from artist Medrith Nuttle are displayed at the Small House.
https://www.clintonnc.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/01/web1_Nuttle_3.jpgCreations from artist Medrith Nuttle are displayed at the Small House.
Small House displays artist’s work

By Chase Jordan

[email protected]

Reach Chase Jordan at 910-249-4617. Follow us on Twitter at @SampsonInd and like us on Facebook.

Reach Chase Jordan at 910-249-4617. Follow us on Twitter at @SampsonInd and like us on Facebook.